Rock Flashback: Procol Harum on Film

matthew fisher Rock Flashback: Procol Harum on Film

Procol Harum organist Matthew Fisher, 2006 (Bruno Vincent/Getty Images)

Yesterday we mentioned [lastfm link_type=”artist_info”]Procol Harum[/lastfm] in conjunction with the career of guitarist [lastfm link_type=”artist_info”]Robin Trower[/lastfm], who played on Procol’s famous late ’60s albums, Shine on Brightly, A Salty Dog, Home, and Broken Barricades, before going solo in 1973. Trower was not a member of the band for its career-making single “Whiter Shade of Pale,” joining in time for the band’s second single, “Homburg.”

This post has nothing to do with Trower, though. We have an entirely different reason for mentioning Procul Harum today.

In the 1960s, a European company developed a video jukebox called the Scopitone, and for a few years, pop and rock artists made Scopitone films that were then synched up to music. Among the artists to make a Scopitone film was Procol Harum, for “Whiter Shade of Pale.” And here it is.

See more Scopitones and learn more about their history at Scopitones.com

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