Watch Your ’94 Accord!

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1994 honda accord Watch Your 94 Accord!

If you own a 1994 Honda Accord, it would be wise to look out the window and make sure it’s still there.  Believe it or not, that’s the most-stolen car in Arizona!  In fact, 7 of the top 10 are from the 90′s.

(Courtesy of Salvador RodriguezArizona Republic)

The 1994 Honda Accord topped the list of the 10 most stolen cars in Arizona, according to a recent report from the National Insurance Crime Bureau.

The list, which is released annually, shows that seven of most stolen cars in Arizona are from the 1990s, while the newest model is from 2006.

Although reselling stolen cars that are more than 10 years old isn’t profitable for thieves, Roger Morris, a spokesman for the insurance crime bureau, said thieves go after these cars because they are easier to steal than newer models and have value for the replacement parts.

“A lot of that is because better technology makes the (newer) cars more difficult to steal,” Morris said. “The crooks are looking for the easiest routes they can to make easy money. The value is in the parts, not just the vehicles themselves.”

A 1994 Honda Accord that could typically sell for about $2,000 could net about $4,000 being chopped and sold as replacement parts – a practice that has become easier because of sales on websites such as Craigslist, Morris said.

The state’s most stolen cars, according to the list released last month, are:

1. 1994 Honda Accord
2. 1995 Honda Civic
3. 2005 Dodge Ram
4. 1997 Ford F-150
5. 2003 Ford F-250
6. 1997 Chevrolet full-size pickup truck
7. 2006 Ford F-350
8. 1998 Nissan Sentra
9. 1997 Nissan Altima
10. 1991 Toyota Camry

Linda Gorman, spokeswoman for AAA Arizona, said owners of older-model cars sometimes make it easier for thieves to steal their cars because they figure their vehicles aren’t targets.

“Thieves are targeting the cars that are easier to get into,” Gorman said. “Many owners – as cars start to age and rack up miles – they become a little more lax about anti-theft measures.

“People may mistakenly believe, ‘Well, my car is 10, 15 years old.’ But the fact that they are easier to steal makes them attractive to thieves.”

NICB suggest drivers take steps to protect their cars:

- Always lock cars.

- Use warning device such as car alarms.

- Use immobilizing devices like smart keys, “kill” switches and fuel cutoffs that prevent the vehicle from starting.

- Using tracking devices, such as LoJack, that alert police or monitoring stations.

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