DANGER!

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puppy DANGER!I received a  press release from the Arizona Humane Society reminding us that as the temperatures creep up toward the triple digits, the risks of our pets suffering – or even dying – – from the heat increases as well.  They gave us tips on keeping our pets safe and healthy during the months ahead.

  • Keep pets indoors!
  • Provide all pets access to cool drinking water at all times (even when they are indoors).
  • If your dog must stay outside, be sure he has plenty of clean, cool, drinking water in a non-metal, spill-proof container.
  • Outdoor dogs may enjoy a baby pool filled with fresh water to relax in as the temperature climbs, but be sure to keep the pool in the shade. Be aware that an in-ground swimming pool is NOT sufficient for drinking water. It contains chemicals that can be harmful or fatal to your pet. As always, watch children around water sources, including large dog dishes and play pools.
  • Be sure your outdoor pets have shelter that is ventilated and has adequate air circulation, preferably in an area that is shaded all day. Never tether your pet outdoors! He can easily become tangled in the rope or chain, thereby prohibiting his access to shade and water. The AHS responds to countless calls about dogs in this predicament every summer and, sadly, most dogs have died by the time rescuers arrive.
  • Walk your pet early in the morning or in the cooler evening hours – never during the heat of the day. The hot pavement, which can reach 160 degrees, will burn and blister your dog’s paws. If your dog must walk on hot asphalt (such as assistance dogs), outfit him with protective boots for his paws.
  • Do not exercise your pet strenuously. Avoid extra-long walks, hikes or excessive play. Just like people, our pets can suffer heat exhaustion by over-exerting themselves on a hot day. But unlike people, they cannot speak up when they need water or a rest.
  • NEVER leave your pet in a parked car. Even on an 85-degree day, the temperature inside a parked car will reach 102 degrees in less than 10 minutes, and will exceed 120 degrees in 30 minutes. On a hot summer day, the temperature inside a parked car will reach 200 degrees in minutes. 

TO GET HELP FOR A PET SUFFERING FROM A HEAT-RELATED AILMENT – OR IN ANY TYPE OF DISTRESS – CALL THE ARIZONA HUMANE SOCIETY AT (602) 997-7586, EXT. 2073.  A SPECIALLY TRAINED AHS EMERGENCY ANIMAL MEDICAL TECHNICIAN™ (EAMT™) WILL BE DISPATCHED TO THE SCENE AND AHS WILL ALERT THE APPROPRIATE LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY.

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